The NH Dept of Ed & the NEA Team Up To Bring Students More Failed Fads

New Hampshire Teachers have seen failed fads come and go but now they are seeing many of the old failed fads resurrected in their classrooms. Failed fads like Outcome Based Education has been called new and innovative now that it’s back in New Hampshire.

Since so many people realize Outcome Based Ed.(OBE) was a failure in the 90′s, Education Reformers changed the name to “Competency Based Education” (CBE) to throw parents off their track. Whether it’s called Outcome Based Ed. or Competency Based Ed. it’s still the same education fad that failed students a few decades ago.

In this post, Student Learning Outcomes and the Decline of American Education, the author takes you through the history of OBE and how education fads led to the decline in American education.

He explains one of these failed fads: Student Learning Outcomes or SLOs:
SLO ancestor Total Quality Management (TQM) slithered into view during the 1980s and spawned Outcome-Based Education (OBE) in the 1990s. TQM was originally a business management theory that preached constant improvement; OBE was an explicitly educational offshoot of TQM that insisted that college courses must have expressed measurable results.

He goes on to note that he critiqued SLOs in 2003:
OBE and Learning Outcomes and Assessment are not about education at all; they are about control. Nothing is more seductive to ideologues and to management than the prospect of creating a meaningless “jargon and data storm” to justify or conceal whatever they do. Where does it end? As William S. Burroughs said, “…control can never be a means to any practical end…. It can never be a means to anything but more control….”

CONTROL. Control of education seems to be something both political parties have been fighting for. The latest federal law (Every Student Succeeds Act ESSA) is about power and control. Sure the talking points tell you that ESSA returns power to the state, but the ultimate authority is the U.S. Secretary of Education. The U.S. Secretary of Education has been given power to withhold funding if state plans are not to his liking. That’s not returning power to the states, that’s unprecedented power to the feds.

Why would ESSA pass with bi-partisan support? Because both parties think they are better at controlling education.

In his article, David Clemens identifies what each political party wants to control when it comes to education policy:
The right sees SLOs as a way to enforce professor accountability, increase “productivity,” and get rid of bad teachers and junk courses. The left sees SLOs as a golden opportunity to promote progressivism through ideological outcomes that students must internalize in order to pass.

He goes on to explain how the social justice political indoctrination is seeping into your child’s curriculum through the SLOs. He also explains how this kind of education reform does nothing to help your child academically. Since most parents want the best for their children, parents across the country are starting to get angry at the dumbing down they see, but it’s also important for parents to see where this is coming from.

Governor Hassan’s Department of Education has been fully facilitating all of the federal reforms without hesitation. No where do you see her or the bureaucrats questioning these fads, but instead they are driving them into our schools without offering administrators any kind of critical analysis.

The New Hampshire Department of Education and the NEA-NH teamed up to develop the SLOs for New Hampshire Schools. You can see in this announcement on their “partnership.” Keep in mind that that NEA in NH has also been working against parents and in support of the dumbed down Common Core Standards.

NEA1

NEA2

The same bureaucratic agency that tells us that their objective is to teach kids to “think critically,” are the same bureaucrats who fail to look at any of these failed fads with a critical eye!

Collecting data on your kids in the name of : Personalized Learning

In a blog post by Diane Ravitch, we actually thought the comments at the end were more interesting and informative:

colomom
August 13, 2016 at 3:06 pm
Another problem with online Machine Learning, (AKA Adaptive Learning, Personalized Learning) is the online programs collect hidden data about the student users, in order to get to know them, personalize the experience. This data goes way beyond simple answers of correct or incorrect, and algorithms can be used to detect personality, behavior, and ability to focus, to name just a few.

Who sees and who uses this highly sensitive and predictive information? (It certainly isn’t transparent to the student, parent or teacher.) Are the predictive analytics used fair or accurate? Will this predictive data be used in predicting job placement or future hires, as is already happening per the Wall Street Journal posted below? Another author asks, “Is Personalized Learning” too Personal”?

“There is a great tension between how software is tracking the outcomes and the learning that students are doing and what happens to that data,” said Betsy Corcoran, chief executive and co-founder of EdSurge, an education technology news site that also sponsors conferences. “Who owns the data? Who is responsible for making sure that data is not abused in some way?”
http://www.recode.net/2015/12/9/11621282/when-personalized-learning-gets-too-personal-google-complaint-exposes

Privacy advocates are calling for transparency and regulation of these “Black Box” or secret algorithms. The Federal Trade Commission agrees and has called on the industry to regulate themselves, asking for algorithmic transparency.

Bottom line: Machines and algorithms should not be allowed to secretly predict people, period; but this is especially heinous when it is happening to children while at school under the guise of “personalized” learning.

Wall Street Journal: Bosses using data brokers to predict applicants. http://www.wsj.com/articles/bosses-harness-big-data-to-predict-which-workers-might-get-sick-1455664940

When Personalized Learning gets too personal. http://www.recode.net/2015/12/9/11621282/when-personalized-learning-gets-too-personal-google-complaint-exposes

FTC Data Brokers- Call for Transparency and Accountability https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/reports/data-brokers-call-transparency-accountability-report-federal-trade-commission-may-2014/140527databrokerreport.pdf
focuses on the first three steps in the life cycle of big data within that industry—collection, compilation, and analytics. discusses how information gathered for one purpose (e.g online assessment or video evidence in data badge) could be compiled and analyzed for other purposes, such as for marketing or risk mitigation in hiring or insurance or line of credit.

FTC the Bias of Big Data: A tool for Inclusion or Exclusion? https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/reports/big-data-tool-inclusion-or-exclusion-understanding-issues/160106big-data-rpt.pdf

FTC- A Call for Algorithmic transparency
https://www.ftc.gov/public-statements/2015/12/transparency-trust-consumer-protection-complex-world-keynote-address

HERE is another comment, but it was removed:

“Digital learning is designed to segue into algorithm-driven workforce development.

Competency-based education and digital learning approaches are intended to reduce a child’s accomplishments into series of “badges” that can be stored in online portfolios.

Tomorrow’s workforce can look forward to a “lifelong learning” scenario where people are compelled to accumulate more and more badges (paying for-profit, online companies for the opportunity and racking up piles of student debt in the process) as they chase job postings dictated by coded skill sets.

We need to make everyone aware that it’s not just academic skills that are being tracked. Social, emotional, and behavioral competencies are in the mix, too.

That is why companies like Parchment (allied with Pearson) are working so hard to position themselves as arbiters of education and workforce credentials. http://exchange.parchment.com/extend/

I’m kind of surprised this is news to you Diane as your son’s merchant banking company Raine Group, is one of Parchment’s major investors.

Alison McDowell
Public School Parent
Philadelphia, PA”

Ralph Boehm candidate for NH Senate in Litchfield and Dist. 18 Manchester

We are hesitant to endorse any candidate for office. Why? Because many candidates say they oppose Common Core OR support parental rights but when it comes to fighting for this, they don’t have the evidence to show they’ve put forth any real effort.

We decided to highlight some of the better candidates out there running for office. We want to make sure you are an informed voter this fall. We will be brining you info on candidates who’ve stood in opposition to our efforts and on the candidates who put forth the effort we expect.

We’d like you to take a look at one candidate for the New Hampshire Senate:
Rep. Ralph Boehm currently sits on the NH House Education Committee and has the record to prove he’s stood up for parents who oppose Common Core. He’s also supported parental rights so we’d like to highlight his record and encourage voters in Litchfield and Manchester Dist. 18 — Wards 5,6,7,8, 9 to get out there and VOTE FOR RALPH BOEHM.

When you look at his record (and we are only highlighting a few of his votes) you will see that unlike his opponent (Sen. Donna Soucy) Rep. Boehm has the record that shows he will fight for parents.

Sen. Soucy has not only stood against parental rights (she tried to repeal HB542 which is a parental rights law) she actively works against parents who are fighting against Common Core and for better academic standards.

Website:
rgboehm4nhsenate.com

Facebook:
Ralph G. Boehm for NH Senate

NH Senate Dist. 18 — Manchester Wards 5,6,7,8, 9 and Litchfield.

HB164
Session Year 2011
Title: requiring legislative approval for the adoption of the common core state standards in New Hampshire.

HB142
Session Year 2015
Title: (3rd New Title) relative to student social media policies by educational institutions and nonpublic sessions under the right-to-know law.

HB1231
Session Year: 2016
Title: relative to school district policy regarding objectionable course material.

HB206
Session Year 2015
Title: (2nd New Title) establishing a committee to study non-academic surveys or questionnaires administered by a public school to its students and relative to non-academic surveys or questionnaires given to students.

HB603
Session Year 2015
relative to student exemption from the statewide assessment.
***Not Boehm’s bill but his amendment replaced the bill.

HB1637
Session Year 2016
relative to school attendance in towns with no public schools.

GO OUT THERE AND HELP HIS CAMPAIGN
Home Address:
6 Gibson Drive
Litchfield, NH 03052-2301
Phone: (603)860-6309
Email: ralph.boehm@leg.state.nh.us

WARNING: Brentwood, Chester, Danville, East Kingston, Epping, Exeter, Fremont, Kingston and Sandown

What did Nancy Steenson do as Board Chair to get rid of Common Core? NOTHING
Nothing except rubber stamp the federal reforms plaguing the Timberlane school district.

Nancy Steenson isn’t fit to be senator for New Hampshire’s 23rd district
Unfortunately for Steenson, her record doesn’t quite match her words. Steenson was a member of the Timberlane school board and then chair of the same school board where her lack of transparency, unaccountability in incivility shone through.
Not only did Steenson completely ignore parents and others in the Timberlane associated towns but she actually shut down public comment on pressing matters.

NO to Steenson for Senate
She is no advocate for free speech or transparency.
Under her leadership the school district was sued by a teacher for a First Amendment violation and had to pay a sizable settlement. Under her leadership the district was sued for violation of our state”s Right to Know law and lost by a unanimous vote in the State Supreme Court. Under her leadership, she tried to impose unconstitutional “School Board Rules” over which the NH ACLU threaten to sue the district. As a result, she had to back away from muzzling other elected members of the board from freely speaking to the press and expressing their own thoughts about district issues.

We encourage you to read both of these articles in full. Parents expect better service than this. NH residents should expect better from their elected representatives.

Common Core Math deficiencies

Do you know what’s missing from the Common Core Math Standards? What are the deficiencies? Do your school board members know? Do your school administrators know?
They should. Not only should they know, they should be making sure parents and school board members are informed.
THEN, they should be making sure these gaps are filled in.

MissingInCCmath-extended-by-standard-content-in-high-achieving

NH Parents Say NO To Psychological Profiling Their Children In School

Since this is all part of the Common Core reform agenda, it’s important that parents speak up. This is an informed parent in Portsmouth who has taken the time to educate herself and let other parents know what is going on in their public schools.

Posted May. 16, 2016 at 2:01 AM (Seacoastonline.com)

May 13 — To the Editor:

SETRA is a proposed reauthorization of the Education Sciences Reform Act, which set up government agencies and funding to conduct education research. If SETRA passes, as written, it will allow the federal government to expand psychological profiling of our children. Section 132 of SETRA expands authorized research to include “research on social and emotional learning (SEL).” SEL is defined as “the process through which children and adults acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships and make responsible decisions.” All of this is proposed under the guise of improving educational outcomes.

How can one objectively measure and report on social and emotional skills? How is this data extracted, who gets to see the results and how is it used? How can such data be protected? The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) has been weakened to allow third-party vendors to access private information from schools without parental consent, so it is no longer a safeguard. Will parents be able to opt their children out of these psychological studies? More importantly, who decides what the necessary skills and attitudes are to manage emotions? Who sets the parameters for what a positive relationship looks like? Our schools are not qualified or licensed to conduct psychological studies on our children nor do they operate under the “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.”

Sadly, New Hampshire is already attempting to measure SEL through what is referred to as Work Study Practices (WSP). On the N.H. education website WSP is defined as “behavioral qualities or habits of mind that students need to be successful in college, career, and life.” Performance Assessment of Competency Education (PACE) is a new assessment mechanism that is being piloted in various school districts around New Hampshire. PACE will measure Work Study Practices or Social Emotional Learning through what is called “Performance Tasks.”

How will our children be “graded” on social and emotional skills? Will our children be held back if they do not display the federal/state “standards” of social and emotional behaviors or the “government approved” attitudes? It is important for parents to ask to see the actual tests such as the Smarter Balanced Assessment, PACE, or The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) so they can see the types of questions being asked and how their children have responded. These tests are supposed to be academic achievement tests yet psychological questions are embedded in these assessments to measure SEL. In the New York Times article below it states that the NAEP will start testing for SEL next year.

We can all agree that it is important for students to respect each other and for teachers to give encouragement where needed to help our children achieve their goals. Social and Emotional Learning delves into areas of a child’s development that should be the responsibility of parents and families. Our children are not guinea pigs and the public schools should not be used as psychological laboratories providing data for government and corporate interests.

For more information on SETRA and SEL see the links below. Ask your congressional representatives more about SETRA and, if you are so inclined, urge them to protect our children and vote No.

https://americanprinciplesproject.org/education/mcgroarty-and-robbins-why-does-your-congressman-want-to-psychologically-profile-your-children/

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/01/us/testing-for-joy-and-grit-schools-nationwide-push-to-measure-students-emotional-skills.html?r=0

Angela Pont
Portsmouth

WARNING: Senate District 16: Towns of Bow, Candia, Dunbarton, Hooksett and Wards 1, 2 and 12 in Manchester.

PARENTS URGENT WARNING, you have a candidate for New Hampshire Senate who has been actively working against your children!

Scott McGilvray is running for New Hampshire Senate in District 16. As the president of the NEA-New Hampshire, many teachers are disappointed with the NEA’s support of Common Core. Not only did the NEA let the teachers down, this teacher blogs about the pay-off to support Common Core.
“NEA has been the recipient of more than seven million dollars since 2009 for the purpose of advocating for CCSS.”

We do NOT need a rubber stamp in Concord working against parents, students and teachers.
There is a good alternative, J.R. Hoell. As a representative, J.R. Hoell has not only advocated for quality academic standards in our public schools, he’s been supportive of parental rights.

Rep. Hoell introduced legislation a few years ago that gave parents the right to opt out of objectionable material. Rep. Hoell has proven to be a champion for public education and parental rights.

Parents you have the proof so now it’s time to make sure you inform your neighbors and friends who really supports students, parents and public education in New Hampshire. It’s NOT Scott McGilvary.

NEA1

NEA2

UPDATE: Joe Duarte is running for Senate in District 16 and is a far better choice for voters in BOW, DUNBARTON, HOOKSETT and parts of MANCHESTER.

While Governor Hassan Throws Your Kids Under the Bus…..

Teachers and administrators can finally speak their minds, now that the Governor Herbert (Utah) admitted that his own grandchildren and children hate Common Core, and that the Common Core represents a loss of local freedoms. This is great news, even if he’s motivated (at least in part) by the highly successful campaigning of his opponent, Jonathan Johnson, on the ‪#‎StopFedEd‬ and ‪#‎StopStudentDataMining‬ and ‪#‎StopCommonCore‬ issues.

EXCERPT:
After spending the past six years promoting, marketing, and providing workforce alignment strategies to serve Common Core, and after rising to the throne of Common Core’s organization, National Governors Association, to become its chair, and after going out of his way to have the Utah Attorney General provide “proof” that Common Core supposedly represented local control– after all of this, Herbert has now turned his back on the Common Core and has written a letter to the State School Board, asking it to move away from Common Core.
Read more here:
Miracles Do Happen: Governor and Chair of Common Core Organization (NGA: National Governors Association) Rejects Common Core

Less TESTING with PACE? Think again

States have been ditching the Smarter Balanced Assessment (SBA) for a few years now. Public backlash has caused some governors to reassess whether they should be using the highly controversial assessments in their public schools.

In NH, Governor Hassan and the bureaucrats at the DoE still can’t admit the SBA was a huge mistake on their part but since parents are refusing to let their kids take it, they are finding other ways to force compliance. The latest assessment scheme they came up with is the PACE assessments.

PACE assessments are in a few pilot schools throughout New Hampshire. Parents are starting to realize that even though they were told there’d be less testing with PACE, that simply isn’t true.

A recent post from a parent in a PACE district who refuses to let her kids take the standardized assessments confirmed this on Facebook:

Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 2.22.04 PM

More info on PACE

Administrators need to do more listening: NO to federal control in grading

Competency Based Ed is similar to the failed Outcome Based Ed fad from the 90′s.
We all know that the federal agenda includes the dumbed down Common Core Standards and a return to the failed Outcome Based Ed Model of dumbed down workforce training.

Included in the Competency Based Ed model, schools have begun switching their grading to the Competency based grading system. Since we can see this happening all over New Hampshire and beyond, it’s easy to see this is coming from more federal intrusion into our local public schools. The feds want to control what your kids eat at lunch, who they share the restroom with, control academic standards and testing, and even the way schools grade their students.
Little is left for the local parents to control.

Competency-based grading caused havoc in Nashua high schools. 92% of students want to get rid of it. 83% of parents want it gone. Even 54% of teachers prefer the old grading system. There were 25% less A’s and 25% more F’s under this new grading system.

Competency-based grading is the stepping stone to the next State reform called PACE, which eliminates local control under the pretense of reducing testing and giving districts more control.

When was the last State mandate that actually gave district more control over education?

It’s important to remember that most of the competencies are “non-academic” skills. These skills are difficult if not impossible to grade objectively. For instance, if a child gets 2+2=4 correct on a test, that’s an objective grade. If that same student is graded on their attitudes towards global warming or if they can “collaborate” that is graded in a more subjective way.

This new grading system means the grades may not reflect their academic knowledge but instead subjectively assess their attitudes, beliefs, values, dispositions, etc.

It’s nice to see a letter instructing the administrators in Nashua to start listening to parents. Our hope is that at some point, they will actually take the advice they’ve been given.

http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/opinion/letters/1080406-465/administrators-need-to-do-more-listening.html

Sunday, May 8, 2016
Administrators need to do more listening
Letter to the Editor
Nashua school administrators have a history of leaving parents, students and teachers out of the process when setting important initiatives.

Competency-based grading was approved because board members were told that the grading system was mandatory. It wasn’t mandatory, but the policy was implemented. There were many complaints at the high school from students, parents, and teachers. The number of students failing classes has increased by 25 percent.

The concerns of stakeholders were ignored. After dragging their feet for months, administration finally sent out a survey to parents, students and teachers. The result of the survey revealed overwhelmingly that stakeholders wanted to return to the traditional grading system. Administration is again choosing to ignore the community and to move ahead with this flawed grading system.

School administrators routinely ignore stakeholders. Five years ago, parents and students expressed concern about block scheduling, specifically the lack of continuity for foreign language, math and science courses. Administrators offered skinny classes, but then claimed no students signed up. They never offered skinny classes again. A simple option would be to hold even and odd class days. Block scheduling is maintained, but students get the continuity needed for foreign language, math and science. That solves the problem and costs nothing.

Administrators complain about the lack of parental involvement. Perhaps parents realize their opinions aren’t welcome. If administrators know best, why is Nashua South ranked 76th out of 77 in the state?

Perhaps administrators should stop talking and start listening. Our students would be better served.

Tracy Pappas

Nashua